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Here’s Where Coffee Costs the Most (and Least) in the U.S.

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Coffee consumption is on the rise, according to a recent survey from the National Coffee Association that found U.S. coffee drinkers increased their intake by 14% since January 2021. But not all cities are made equal when it comes to buying a cuppa joe.

While coffee prices have fluctuated in response to inflation (along with every other item in the grocery store), having a cup in certain cities can cost consumers big time. The real estate site Clever analyzed the average prices of a cappuccino in 50 U.S. cities, breaking down the least and most expensive places to grab your morning mud.

What the data says

Virginia Beach, Virginia, has the most expensive cappuccino in the U.S., according to Clever’s analysis, while people in Riverside, California, are spending the least on average on their visits to the cafe.

Most expensive cappuccino

  1. Virginia Beach, Virginia: $5.75 per cup

  2. Las Vegas, Nevada: $5.40 per cup

  3. Minneapolis, Minnesota: $5.37 per cup

  4. New York, New York: $5.31 per cup

  5. San Francisco, California: $5.21 per cup

Least expensive cappuccino

  1. Riverside, California: $3.88 per cup

  2. Cincinnati, Ohio: $3.95 per cup

  3. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: $4.12 per cup

  4. Buffalo, New York: $4.12 per cup

  5. Milwaukee, Wisconsin: $4.14 per cup

The takeaway

Like almost every consumer good, coffee has increased in price lately (by about 14.3% between December 2021 and December 2022, according to Bureau of Labor and Statistics data). While those numbers only apply to coffee purchased in the store and not pre-made coffee, the rising cost of beans means consumers felt the impact at the cafe, as well.

An agricultural report from financial services company Rabobank predicts coffee prices will dip early this year, but not enough to overcome the historic highs consumer goods have reached amid inflation. However, the report also expects a better crop of coffee beans — weather permitting — in 2023, potentially providing higher quality coffee supply at lower prices.

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